The Latest Installment of Beck's "Record Club"

by Arnold Pan

6 July 2010

 

If you haven’t been keeping up with Beck’s online-only “Record Club” enterprise, here’s a quick recap: Teaming up with indie luminaries, Beck has created one-day one-off projects covering entire albums, then releasing the studio sessions one track per week via Vimeo clips. The first few efforts gave at least a little insight into his influences, since you’d expect anyone of Beck’s lineage to play such classics as The Velvet Underground and Nico and The Songs of Leonard Cohen with proper reverence. The Record Club just wrapped up a rendering of INXS’s Kick, which might’ve seemed kitschy if not for the real effort put into it by the likes of St. Vincent’s Annie Clark, Liars, and Os Mutantes; check out the surprisingly tender version of “Never Tear Us Apart”.
  
However, it’s probably safer to say that Beck has finally jumped the snark by bringing aboard Sonic Youth and Tortoise to interpret… wait for it… Yanni Live at the Acropolis. The pairing of the musicians to the source material would seem patently absurd, but it’s just the sort of zaniness you would’ve expected from Beck during his reign as modern rock’s court jester in the “Loser” era—which oddly coincides with Yanni’s heyday, too. But with Moore adding some vocals to the improvised rendition, it’s actually a bit hard to identify the initial inspiration if you didn’t know any better. See for yourself below.

Topics: beck | inxs | yanni
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