Gangsta Rap Meets the Food Network in 'Dinner Table Game'

by Benjamin Aspray

30 July 2010

 

As the economy gasps for breath and turns a generation of college graduates into under-employed, over-dependent man-children, there’s nothing more gangster than learning to take care of yourself. In the world of New York rappers Buckwheat Groats (producer/hype-man Lil Dinky, and MC Penis Bailey the Bailey), cooking a simple, nutritious dinner of chicken, rice pilaf, minestrone, and broccoli, with special attention paid to hygiene (“if you think it’s undercooked, you’re wildin’ fella / Buckwheat Groats don’t get down with no salmonella”) and economy (“shove the rest up in some Tupperware ‘cause I’m a frugal motherfucker”), is as much a display of urban machismo as wealth and gun murder, and accordingly, it “keeps the chicas going loca.” 

If you haven’t grasped it by now, comedy is this duo’s game. But make no mistake: the spare, spacey beats, courtesy of Lil Dinky and Fatty Eisenhower, are a spot-on throwback to the Oakland flatlands of the ‘90s, where the laid-back electro of Luniz’s “I Got 5 on It” prevailed over the meatier, bouncier G-funk coming out of LA and New York. Also, Penis Bailey the Bailey has a hell of a flow, and is savvy enough to know that his (very funny) lyrics could only work when delivered with a straight face. Their next single? They’re keeping mum about it, but rumor has it’s about hitting on teenagers at the shopping mall. I’m betting there’ll be a lot of jokes about Urban Outfitters and MySpace. So basically, Ninjasonik, but with laughs, instead of hollow hipster signifiers.

 

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