The Violent Legacy of Flour Power

by Joseph Fisher

5 August 2010

Apparently, my fellow PopMatters readers, we have reared an entire generation of very angry food. So angry is this generation of food, that it has declared an epic civil war with itself.
Image from the front page of the Cupcake Wars website 

George Edergly Harris III in Heaven have we ignored the legacy of the 1960s? If global catastrophes like the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the recent BP Oil Spill, and the depletion of the Arctic ice pack have not demonstrated how deeply we have misunderstood the ideology of flower power, then a quick peek at your weekly Travel Channel and Food Network programming guides should accomplish that in an instant.


  

Apparently, my fellow PopMatters readers, we have reared an entire generation of very angry food.  So angry, is this generation of food, that it has declared an epic civil war with itself.  Thankfully, Scripps Networks Interactive is on the scene to cover every conceivable angle of this carnage in all of its gooey detail:

Man v. Food

24 Hour Restaurant Battle

Food Network Challenge (By the way, where are the “fighting tongs” shelved at Williams-Sonoma?)

Cupcake Wars

The most distressing of these enemy combatants are the cupcakes, because their political beliefs are very contradictory.  As such, they could change sides at any moment.

Why, you ask, are these foods so mad at man and food alike? I only wish that I could answer such a pressing question. My only guess is that it has something to do with the ingredients.

 

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