More Body Horror

On Takashi Miike

by Jason Cook

3 September 2010

Takashi Miike's Yatterman 

If you know Takashi Miike at all, then you’re probably a good enough horror fan already. If you don’t know him then, as long as you like horror, body horror in particular, you’re missing out. Miike is like a Japanese Eli Roth, though he’s older, more varied and prolific, and often less sardonic. Eli Roth is a monument in current American Horror, triumphant mainly because of his “gore porn” contribution to the 2000s’ “Splat Pack” era, supplementing Saw’s economic revival of horror with Hostel, an instantly memorable assault on America’s fascination with sexual conquest in Europe.

Miike, like Roth, understands horror and where we are, in the Third World, on a dark and filmic level. He’s responsible for years of films worth your time and attention, often considers the same limits as Roth and other American body horror filmmakers, leading us through the lives of an experimentally distorted family in Visitor Q (2001); a flamboyant serial killer in Ichi the Killer (2001); and amid the Yakuza in a David Lynch-ian for 2003’s Gozu.

Miike is perhaps most well know for 1999’s Audition, but don’t skip is unaired episode of Showtime’s Masters of Horror series, “Imprint”.


  

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