Moving Pixels Podcast

Exploring New Vegas

by G. Christopher Williams

13 December 2010

Bethesda's latest iteration of the Fallout series offers Sin City as one of the last remaining beacons of hope in their postapocalyptic American Wastleland.
 

Bethesda’s latest iteration of the Fallout series offers Sin City as one of the last remaining beacons of hope in their postapocalyptic American Wastleland.  Despite the buggy quality of the game at release, many players still found themselves “all in” for this expansion of the retro-futuristic universe.

This week the Moving Pixels podcast crew discuss the subtleties of socialization, scrounging, and survival in New Vegas.
  

This podcast is also available via iTunes.

 

Additional discussion of Fallout: New Vegas:

Fallout: New Vegas: Place Your Bets and Save Your Game by Rick Dakan

Fallout, the “To Do” List Simulator by G. Christopher Williams

Fallout: The Scrounging Simulator by G. Christopher Williams

Sex Workers and Sex Slavery in Fallout: New Vegas by Rick Dakan

 

Our podcast contributors:

Rick Dakan is a regular contributor to the Moving Pixels blog as well as to the Gamma Testing podcast.

G. Christopher Williams is the Multimedia Editor at PopMatters.com.  You can find his weekly updates featured at the Neuromance blog.

Nick Dinicola is also a regular contributor to the Moving Pixels blog.

Thomas Cross contributes frequently to the Multimedia section at PopMatters.com, and he also pens the Diamond in the Rough column for GameSetWatch.

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