Moving Pixels Podcast

The World of 'Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood'

by G. Christopher Williams

10 January 2011

The direct sequel to Assassin's Creed II returns to the story of the Italian Renaissance era assassin, Ezio. However, this time Ezio has made a few new friends.
 

This week, the Moving Pixels podcast crew trains their eyes on the direct sequel to Assassin’s Creed II. This time the series returns to the story of the Italian Renaissance era assassin, Ezio. 

However, this time Ezio has made a few new friends.  So, among other aspects of the game, we discuss the “brotherhood” that this new Assassin’s Creed has embraced in both its story and multiplayer options.
  

This podcast is also available via iTunes.

 

Additional discussion of Assassin’s Creed:

Gaming and Politics in 2010 by Nick Dinicola

The Miracle Is in the Execution: The Indifferent Kill in Assasin’s Creed by G. Christopher Williams

Project Legacy: My First Facebook Game by Nick Dinicola

Assassin’s Creed: In the Simulation, Nothing is True, and Everything is Permitted by G. Christopher Williams

The Mystery of Assassin’s Creed by Nick Dinicola

The Assassin’s Religion by Nick Dinicola

Landscape Painting and the Vistas of Assassin’s Creed II by G. Christopher Williams

Locomotion, Parkour, and the Illusion of Competence in Video Games by G. Christopher Williams

 

Our podcast contributors:

Rick Dakan is a regular contributor to the Moving Pixels blog as well as to the Gamma Testing podcast.

G. Christopher Williams is the Multimedia Editor at PopMatters.com.  You can find his weekly updates featured at the Neuromance blog.

Nick Dinicola is also a regular contributor to the Moving Pixels blog.

Thomas Cross contributes frequently to the Multimedia section at PopMatters.com, and he also pens the Diamond in the Rough column for GameSetWatch.

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