Moving Pixels Podcast

Reflections on E3 2011

by G. Christopher Williams

20 June 2011

From the WiiU and Vita to the new Lara Croft, the Moving Pixels podcast looks at E3 2011.
 

Last weekend the Moving Pixels podcast crew convened to discuss our impressions of E3 2011.  While Rick Dakan, Nick Dinicola, and G. Christopher Williams all caught glimpses of the expo via the web or television, we are joined by Kris Ligman, who attended this year’s event.

Like many others, we couldn’t help but focus on some of the bigger announcements of this year, the previews of new hardware releases from Sony and Nintendo.  Additionally, we spend a lot of time considering the revamping of Lara Croft in the new Tomb Raider.  So, something old (kind of) and something new to consider in this year’s big gaming event.
  

 

This podcast is also available via iTunes.

 

More discussion of E3:

Electronic Empire Expo: The First World Problem of E3 by Kris Ligman

 

Our podcast contributors:

Rick Dakan is a regular contributor to the Moving Pixels blog as well as to the Gamma Testing podcast.

G. Christopher Williams is the Multimedia Editor at PopMatters.com.  You can find his weekly updates featured at the Neuromance blog.

Nick Dinicola is also a regular contributor to the Moving Pixels blog.

Kris Ligman contributes frequently to the Moving Pixels blog at PopMatters.com, and she also serves as an editor for The Hathor Legacy.

 

You can follow the Moving Pixels blog on Twitter.

Topics: 2011 | e3 | tomb raider | vita | wiiu
 

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