The Top 10 Male Performances That Should Have Won Oscar

by Bill Gibron

30 November 2011

 

As November grinds to a halt, as December announces the arrival of the end of each particular year, film critics and fans of the medium start contemplating awards—bests and worsts, the deserving and the soon to be discarded. It’s a ritual as traditional as pumpkin pie, fantasy football, the tannenbaum, and of course, the complementary complaining about movies and makers still MIA. Sit in on any cinematic sewing circle and just listen to the laundry list of complaints—director’s wrongfully snubbed, films erroneously praised—and you come to a clear conclusion: even within groups where consensus seems to strive for balance, the good aren’t always given their due and the dreadful often walk away with gold.

Sometimes, however, the failures are more than egregious. They stare you squarely in the face and announce their lack of careful consideration. Roberto Benigni may have wowed the unfamiliar with his farcical take on the Holocaust, but in retrospect, Life Is Beautiful didn’t deserve any of the accolades it received. In fact, similar statements can be made about titles as diverse as West Side Story or The Return of the King. With that in mind, the next four installments of List This will try and highlight ten of the many slights experienced by actors, actresses, directors, and their movies. While there are many, many more, the one’s selected represent a real lack of vision on the part of voters and those who support such annual appraisals. Beginning with the men, we offer the following:

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