Moving Pixels Podcast

Exploring Open Worlds

by G. Christopher Williams

16 January 2012

The Moving Pixels podcast talks about what the open world genre means to the last decade in gaming and what kinds of worlds most compel players to explore them.
 

In view of our topic, this episode of the Moving Pixels podcast is expansive.  In other words, this is quite a long episode. 

Nick Dinicola, Mattie Brice, and I found quite a lot to discuss about the open world genre this week.  It is a genre that has become widespread across the medium over the past decade (thanks in no part to a little game called Grand Theft Auto III).  Worlds of all kinds have been built for players to explore, telling stories in genres as diverse as crime, the western, fantasy, science fiction, and even schoolhouse drama.

We talk a little about what the genre means to this last decade in gaming and what kinds of worlds most compel players to explore them.
  

This podcast is also available via iTunes.

 

Our podcast contributors:

G. Christopher Williams is the Multimedia Editor at PopMatters.com.  You can find his weekly updates featured at the Neuromance blog.

Nick Dinicola is also a regular contributor to the Moving Pixels blog and appears regularly on the Game Hounds podcast. 

Mattie Brice is a blogger here at PopMatters and also a contributor at The Border House.

 

You can follow the Moving Pixels blog on Twitter.

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