An Evening of Joss Whedon with the Film Society of Lincoln Center (video)

by Sachyn Mital

15 July 2013

As lovers of Joss Whedon over here at PopMatters, we were remiss by not sharing his conversation with Lincoln Center earlier.
 

When Joss Whedon’s new movie Much Ado About Nothing had a sneak preview at Lincoln Center, the director turned up for a conversation about his career, including this film, The Avengers and his many other productions.

At the time of the conversation, people knew Arrested Development would be returning as a series. So when the discussion turned towards Firefly, Whedon’s too-promptly-canceled television series, the audience hoped his show could return but alas, that scenario doesn’t sound promising.
  
One concern that should have been brought up further in the conversation was the fact that though Whedon mentioned he excised an anti-Semitic reference from the Shakespearean lyrics, he chose to leave in a racially tinged line about marrying “an Ethiope”—even going so far as to place a visual gag of a shocked black woman (who I don’t think appears anywhere else in the movie) in the scene. I’m still curious to know why the former reference was cut over the other.

Without drawing out this drama, the conversation itself was entertaining and the Whedon geeks in attendance got a chance to pepper him during a Q&A. Whedon’s response to a question asking if there was a Marvel character he wishes he could do is particularly inspired. Watch the 36-minute conversation below to see his response.

 

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