DOE EYE - 'T E L E V I S I O N' (album stream) (Premiere)

by PopMatters Staff

28 April 2014

San Francisco's Maryam Qudus (a.k.a DOE EYE) is an impressive singer and multi-instrumentalist releasing her debut album, TE L E V I S I O N produced by John Vanderslice, tomorrow.
 

Maryam Qudus grew up in a Muslim household, the daughter of Afghani ex-patriots, with early musical gifts that led her onto the Berklee College of Music in 2011. She has been making music constantly since that time, writing all of her material and mastering many instruments, while perfecting her enigmatic voice.
  
Qudus tells us about the recording process: “In Christmas 2012, I decided to get away from the lonely city life I had been living and moved back home in the suburbs to make a record. There is something very weird and mundane about moving back home. Enclosed in the bedroom walls from my teenage years, I spent most of my time writing and reflecting upon my life. When I wanted to get away from the heaviness of it all, I would read a book or turn on the television and zone out into the world that had been presented to me. The record was recorded to two-inch tape at Tiny Telephone Studios in San Francisco, produced by John Vanderslice and engineered by Jacob Winik. They helped bring out the emotion and sadness out of this record, along with my long time collaborators, Nic de la Riva and David Kawamura. We spent most of 2013 making this record together and it has landed in the hands of many of my heroes. After two years of putting my entire heart into this album, I am happy that T E L E V I S I O N will finally be out for the world to listen to on April 29.”


 

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