Ringo Starr

The Most Animated Beatle

by Jessy Krupa

8 July 2014

Let’s celebrate Ringo Starr’s 74th birthday with cartoons.

It’s hard to believe, but week marks the 74th birthday of Ringo Starr. He’s one of rock’s most accomplished drummers and a successful solo artist, but have you ever realized how many times he has been animated?
In 1965, the Beatles got their own Saturday morning cartoon series. Despite the fact that the group didn’t voice their own characters or have any involvement in its production, their songs were used in every episode. The vast majority of its segments revolved around Ringo’s character, who was typecast as the well-meaning but dim-witted comic relief.


The 1968 film Yellow Submarine was a technological marvel, with a unique animation style that is often listed by modern artists as an inspiration. Ringo’s character has many memorable moments during the movie, such as when he summons the rest of the group, pushes a mysterious red button, or befriends the Boob.


Disney was planning a computer-animated remake of the movie in 2011, but canceled the production after the dismal performance of Mars Needs Moms. There has to be enough footage for a future music video somewhere in their vaults, though.

Ringo was one of the first celebrities to guest appear on The Simpsons. Prior to his voice cameo is the classic moment when Homer discovers who was Marge’s favorite Beatle.


Many years later, the writers of Family Guy featured this (highly inaccurate) re-enactment of Ringo’s first songwriting experience.



Yellow Submarine mistakenly referred to John as Billy Shears, but the creators of The Beatles: Rock Band correctly animated Ringo as the lead singer of “With a Little Help From My Friends”.



And in his most recent animated appearance, Ringo appeared on The Powerpuff Girls: Dance Pantsed as a magician who sings “I Wish I Was a Powerpuff Girl”.



If I’m forgetting any animated Ringo Starr moments, let me know in the comments below.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

READ the article