Dot Hacker - "Somersault" (audio) (Premiere)

by Brice Ezell

8 September 2014

As you enjoy the last days of summer while you can, give the dreamy and warm "Somersault" from the California rock band Dot Hacker a spin.
 

Back in the ‘60s and ‘70s, it wasn’t uncommon for a band or artist to release anywhere from one to three albums in a year. (See the voluminous discography of Frank Zappa for a case in point.) While Prince may have recently garnered a lot of attention with his announcement that he plans to release two albums on the same day at the end of September, the California rock band Dot Hacker already beat him to the punch.
  
The group, comprised of Josh Klinghoffer (vocals, guitar, keyboards), Clint Walsh (guitar, keyboards, backing vocals), Jonathan Hischke (bass) and Eric Gardner (drums), has had an ambitious 2014 thus far. In July, Dot Hacker dropped How’s Your Process? (Work); now, they’re finishing what they started with the complementarily-titled How’s Your Process? (Play). These two records mark their second and third studio outings, and based on the productivity the band has demonstrated this year, there’ll be plenty more to hear going forward.

Below, you can stream the woozy and dreamy “Somersault”, a song which features lovely interplay between guitar and bass as each one weaves in and out of the song’s textural foreground.



How’s Your Process? (Play) out via ORG Music on 10/7. How’s Your Process? (Work) is out now.

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