Bugs in the Dark - "Red Lines" (audio) (Premiere)

by Brice Ezell

9 September 2014

At the intersection of indie rock and occult rock you can find Bugs in the Dark and their latest single, "Red Lines".
 

There’s enough in the music of Bugs in the Dark to suggest that they could be comfortably categorized as an indie rock band. However, the distorted guitars and powerful vocals (courtesy of frontwoman Karen Rockower) bring to mind the recent rash of bands coming out of the occult rock subgenre, namely Jess & the Ancient Ones. In taking the spare indie aesthetic and merging it with a primal rock sound, Bugs in the Dark strike a winning balance. The band’s latest single, “Red Lines”, is a perfect example of this.
  
Bugs in the Dark tells PopMatters about the song, “We wrote ‘Red Lines’ in the middle of winter, rehearsing in a cement garage, trying to be warriors and playing through the cold. The warehouse was a bone chilling mess of pieced together equipment, cables, and mics, so we worked hard to sweat even though we were freezing our asses off. We ended up having to record the rest of the guitars somewhere else because it was just too cold to play.

“The song is about how you really need to fight for your dreams, you know? Paint that face and go a little nuts in front of everything telling you it’s impossible. Turn your temperature up and go to war for it.”



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