Dreamers - "Wolves" (download) (exclusive)

by Brice Ezell

25 September 2014

For fans of supremely catchy indie in the vein of Pete Yorn, look no further: you can exclusively download the sing-along ready "Wolves" by the Brooklyn-by-way-of-Seattle group Dreamers.
 

Indie bands are a dime a dozen these days, as made evident by the veritable deluge of bands from Brooklyn that continues to put out release after release of low-key, guitar-driven rock. The trio that calls itself Dreamers also calls Brooklyn its home base, but as its latest song “Wolves” evinces, it is able to rise above the masses through one simple tactic: writing a fantastic chorus. Using the folksy wisdom of the main refrain “If you lie down with wolves / You learn to howl” as an anchor, Dreamers craft a tune that’s likely to have people singing along with the song’s lupine aphorism.
  
Nick Wold, whose vocals bring Pete Yorn to mind, says to PopMatters of the tune, “‘Wolves’ is a tale about how other people can influence you, drag you down, drag you up, or generally affect you, especially if you pay a lot of attention to them. We become what we surround ourselves with, be it positive or negative, and we are cosmic creatures of habit and circumstance… so choose wisely. My dad used to say, ‘If you lie down with dogs, you get fleas’; our version is, ‘If you lie down with wolves, you learn to howl.’”

Download “Wolves” via the SoundCloud link below:


Watch the video for “Wolves” below:


Dreamers’ new EP, This Album Does Not Exist, is out on November 16th.

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