Will Dailey - "Higher Education" (video) (Premiere)

by Brice Ezell

29 September 2014

The video for Will Dailey's banjo-driven "Higher Education" raises the lyric video to a whole other level.
 

Following several albums on a major label, Boston singer-songwriter Will Dailey released his new album National Throat independently, and with considerable success: the album debuted in the top 20 of Billboard’s Heatseekers chart. Dailey’s latest video for the album, “Higher Education”, which you can view below, derives from his experience working as an artist ambassador at ZUMIX, an East Boston-based nonprofit organization dedicated to empowering youth and building communities through music and the arts. Since he was so inspired by his experience at ZUMIX, he decided to film the “Higher Education” music video at the organization, including several of the children he worked with during his time there.
  
Dailey tells PopMatters about the video: “Madeleine Steczynski, the founder of ZUMIX, started the program in her East Boston apartment in 1991 in response to a wave of youth violence. National Throat was born out of a souring business relationship and started as a mission statement on my website. My time as Artist Ambassador at ZUMIX is a reflection of my ongoing education, and seeing the success of this organization reaffirms my belief that independent passions can achieve great results.”



National Throat, which was released after a successful Pledge Music campaign, is out now.

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