United States of Rage and Love

Green Day - "Give Me Novacaine" and "She's a Rebel"

by Jordan Blum

7 October 2014

The seventh and eighth tracks on American Idiot solidify Jesus' transformation into St. Jimmy, as well as introduce the woman who holds onto his heart like a "hand grenade". It's emotional, powerful, and very catchy.
 
cover art

Green Day

American Idiot

(Reprise)
US: 21 Sep 2004
UK: 20 Sep 2004

Review [14.Oct.2004]

Despite all of its political overtones, American Idiot is, above all else, an emotional and personal tale of teenage angst and uncertainty. Sure, there’s plenty of social commentary about the psychological and governmental state of America post-9/11, but the heart of the record is the saga of a punk rebel who struggles with identity, romance, and acceptance. Each of these attributes are brought to the surface with endearing aggression on the LP’s seventh and eighth tracks, “Give Me Novacaine” and “She’s a Rebel”. Lost, confused, and yet born again and anew, the protagonist must now come to terms with both his new persona and new object of affection.
  
At its core, “Give Me Novacaine” is another ballad. Its verses feature delicate acoustic guitar chord progressions, melodic slide guitar, a straightforward drum beat, and of course, Billie Joe Armstrong’s voice at its most fragile and yearning. When the chorus hits, though, every element gets injected with adrenaline—the guitars are crunchy and invasive, the percussion is frantic, and the vocals are in-your-face domineering. Really, this is one of the most dynamic tracks on the album, as the contrast between light and heavy instrumentation is significant and powerful. It certainly represents the thematic dissonance well.

At this point in the narrative, Jesus of Suburbia has manifested a new personality, St. Jimmy. Brash, boisterous, and very brave, St. Jimmy is the extroverted, fearless leader that Jesus never was. In a way, “Give Me Novacaine” represents the final act of the transformation, as Jesus effectively commits suicide so that St. Jimmy can take over. Lyrics like “Take away the sensation inside / Bittersweet migraine in my head” and “I get the funny feeling and that’s already / Jimmy says it’s better than here ... Tell me Jimmy, I won’t feel a thing” indicate this longing. St. Jimmy is Jesus’ savior (as I said in the previous installment, it’s very similar to how Tyler Durden “saved” the narrator in Fight Club).

Fascinatingly, as much as Jesus is definitely looking to St. Jimmy for help and answers, he’s also speaking to an unknown romantic interest (who is introduced in the next song). He says, “Give a long kiss goodnight / And everything will be alright / Tell me that I won’t feel a thing” and “Out of body and out of mind / Kiss the demons out of my dreams”. It’s thought-provoking that the band chose to suggest a new character before officially introducing her, but this song takes place on June 13th (over a month after “St. Jimmy”), so we can assume that a lot has happened in the interim that Green Day chose to imply rather than explain.

Fortunately, “She’s a Rebel” is very much the yang to the ying of “St. Jimmy”, as it’s very similar in both structure and purpose. In fact, it interrupts the previous song, just as “St. Jimmy” did to “Are We the Waiting”. Another anthemic punk rock gem, its verse sections burst with hostility, as the guitar riffs are crunchy and thick, the rhythms are hypnotic, and the vocals are layered and authoritative. There’s also a start/stop rhythmic pattern that keeps listeners enticed and on edge. On the other hand, the chorus is as charming as anything else on American Idiot, as Armstrong sings an optimistic melody, backed by subtle harmonies. It’s not as multifaceted as its predecessor, but it’s still a kickass moment.

As for its sentiments, this song is clearly written from the perspective of St. Jimmy as he first notices (and becomes infatuated with) this new teenager from the wrong side of the tracks. He eventually tells us that she’s called “Whatshername” (which symbolizes the universality of their connection, as just about every heterosexual teenage male has had his own Whatshername at some point, be she a delinquent, an artist, a geek, etc.) Much like the description Jesus had for St. Jimmy, St. Jimmy tells us that “She’s a rebel / She’s a Saint / She’s the salt of the earth and she’s dangerous”.

Interestingly, this song is also the inspiration for the album’s iconic cover, as he adds, “She’s the symbol of resistance / And she’s holding on my heart like a hand grenade”. There’s no doubt that St. Jimmy views her as both the love of his life and the missing piece of his rebellious mission. In this moment, he confesses that she’s essentially his soul mate: “Is she trouble? / Like I’m trouble? / Make it a double twist of fate / Or a melody that / She sings the revolution / The dawning of our lives / She brings this liberation / That I just can’t define”.

This dedication makes sense, though, when one considers how vulnerable, naïve, and desperate for validation and love St. Jimmy is. He’s essentially found a new woman for himself (as a new man), and he’s eager to solidify the partnership and start the revolution. Of course, love and lofty, grandiose ambitions rarely come to satisfactory fruition, so things won’t go as well as he thinks. She may be an extraordinary girl, but she’s also a ticking letter bomb waiting to go off.


Previous installments:

*Introduction and “American Idiot”
*“Jesus of Suburbia”
*“Holiday”
*“Boulevard of Broken Dreams”
*“Are We the Waiting” and “St. Jimmy”

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