Zulu Pearls - "Boss of Your Heart (Live)" (video) (Premiere)

by Brice Ezell

26 November 2014

The Berlin by way of Washington, DC indie rockers that call themselves Zulu Pearls have a nice, noir-y live video to accompany one of their newer tunes, "Boss of Your Heart".
 

Comprised of a “ever changing constellation of international vagabonds” and helmed by Zach Van Hoozer, the indie rock project Zulu Pearls are a definite anomaly in their native Berlin. Although indie rock’s span continues to grow across the globe, Berlin—like many major German cities—is most commonly known as a source for some of the best electronic music of the present day. The clean, almost shimmering guitars and and tenor vocals are hardly suited to a grimy club, sure, but they’re perfectly suited for Zulu Pearls’ latest video, the noir-esque “Boss of Your Heart”, directed by James Slater.
  
Van Hoozer tells PopMatters about the video, “This is the second of the series of songs off the Singles Deluxe EP that we performed at Heiner’s Bar (aka Weserstrasse 58). I was happy to get such a variety of friends and acquaintances in to watch us play. It’s a real document of a specific era of the band as two of the members have since moved on to other endeavors. But we remain a close knit crew, including our friend and director James Slater who is now based in London and does bigger videos for bands like the Kaiser Chiefs and Mark Owen. We have this to remind us of all being in the same place, which is great.”



Singles Deluxe EP is out now on Cantora.

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