Mary Epworth - "Sweet Boy" (audio) (Premiere)

by Brice Ezell

3 April 2015

Mary Epworth may be English, but the gentle, vocal harmony-led tune "Sweet Boy" evokes American folk revival greats like Gillian Welch.
 

Leading up to the release of her new album Dream Life, English singer and songwriter Mary Epworth has already culled some impressive attention in her native UK. Three of her singles have been added to playlists on BBC 6 Music, and her song “Black Doe” was picked as BBC Radio 1’s Hottest Record in the World. She and her band have been fortunate to land sell-out shows at prestigious venues like the Royal Albert Hall’s Elgar Room in London.

One listen to the Dream Life number “Sweet Boy” will make it clear why so many are starting to get taken by Epworth’s music. With a distinctly neo-Americana vibe that recalls the music of Gillian Welch, the track also owes a debt of gratitude to some of the masters of folk vocal harmony: the Everly Brothers. Don’t be mistaken, though: this folk sound is but one of many detours taken by Dream Life, which also incorporates psychedelic and kosmische influences.
  
Epworth had this to say to PopMatters about the tune, “I wrote this for someone who got away, but then I sent him the song and it lured him back. I’ve always loved close harmony, and nobody does it better than the Everly Brothers.”



Dream Life is out on 19 May on physical formats and 7 April via digital media.

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