The Shoe Birds - "You Leave Me Blind" (audio) (Premiere)

by Brice Ezell

21 May 2015

With a little Skynyrd in the guitar and a lot of heart in its anthemic chorus, "You Leave Me Blind" finds MIssissippi's the Shoe Birds delivering an earnest slice of country rock.
Photo: Tim Ivy 

Songs about breakups are a dime a dozen, but there’s a reason why that’s the case: it’s a powerful universal emotion that has a million different angles to it. No one song can be all-encompassing in its examination of the lovelorn state. Mississippi’s own the Shoe Birds know this, and for their take on heartbreak, “You Leave Me Blind” they craft an anthemic, driving pop/rock number that culminates in its sing-along ready chorus.

“You Leave Me Blind” can be found on the Shoe Birds’ forthcoming Southern Gothic LP.
  
Rhythm guitarist Norman Adcox says to PopMatters, “The song talks about the bitterness and heartache that follows a breakup with someone you cared deeply about, only to find out that person was in love with someone else. When that happens, it often cuts off the tunnel that carries light from the outside world to your heart, making you blind to new relationships and feelings. This song was a way to move forward from that experience. I think getting dumped by someone you love is something everyone’s gone through at some point in their life. We’re just lucky to be able to get it out of our system with a killer rock ‘n’ roll song.”


Southern Gothic is out on 26 May via WaxSaw Records.

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