Cute Is What We Aim For - 4 November 2008

New York, Fillmore at Irving Plaza

by Gaelen Harlacher

11 November 2008

 

There may have been tension at the polls on Tuesday November 4th but things were running smoothly at this show. Everything ran on time with minimal gaps between bands, something that can really make or break a night for some. Rocket to the Moon kicked things off, followed by Automatic Loveletter, with Cute Is What We Aim For co-headlining with Secondhand Serenade.

Hailing from Buffalo, Cute Is What We Aim For kicked out a high energy performance and kept their political statements short and sweet. Starting with “Doctor”, the second track off their recent Fueled by Ramen release, Rotation, the band’s set was equally divided between new and old material. And as the songs flew off the stage, a few items made their way back onto it—a bra and a package of environmentally friendly animal bedding. Bras on stage are old news, animal bedding—creative.

Between songs Shaant Hacikyan (lead vocals) threw in comments such as “you’ll probably know this one,” and “maybe you’ll know this—it’s new.” Though the crowd knew the words to every song regardless of how new or old it was. According to Hacikyan it was their fourth time playing in the Big Apple and by far the best. Like the first track on Rotation and the last song of their set, “Practice Makes Perfect”.

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