Avi Jacob - "New England" (audio) (premiere)

by Jonathan Frahm

13 October 2017

Avi Jacob weaves a story of heartbreak and traveling home in this cozy, gospel-tinged Americana tune.
Photo: Andrew Cebulka 

The topmost appeal of Avi Jacob’s art is its honesty. Though his first memories consist of “feeling completely isolated, sad, and alone,” the Boston singer-songwriter willingly puts himself out there for his audience. The result is a warmhearted feeling attached to his overarching body of work, all set out to speak the truth, relating his melancholic life stories to others. Together, they achieve mutual healing.
  
Produced in the Catskills by one new member and one past member of the Felice Brother family—James and Simone Felice, respectively—his latest single, “New England”, carries on this trend. Lyrically, it’s a melancholy reflection on a heartbreaking moment that sees him returning home to New England. Sonically, it’s a gospel-tinged Americana arrangement straight from the hearth that pairs perfectly with his bittersweet storytelling that sells his latest work.

“New England” is a track from off of Jacob’s upcoming EP, Surrender. On the EP, he says, “I’m trying to connect people to the reality of their emotions. If they understand them, then they can understand and have empathy for others.”

TOUR DATES
10/18 - Providence, RI / The Grange (solo)
10/19 - Sommerville, MA / Once Ballroom Lounge (trio)
11/16 - Northampton, MA / The Parlour Room, w/ Dom Flemons (solo)
12/7 - Fairhope, AL / The Blueberry Sessions, w/ Griffin House (solo)

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