Bendigo Fletcher - 'Bendigo Fletcher' (album stream) (premiere)

by Jonathan Frahm

11 May 2017

With tight harmonies, soaring instrumental bridges, and a knack for developing earworm melodies across a broad scope of musical styles, Bendigo Fletcher scorches on their debut EP.
 

Shades of the aural folk rock that’s pervaded releases by the likes of Band of Horses and Fleet Foxes flow through Bendigo Fletcher’s debut EP as naturally as they wear their Kentuckian roots on their sleeves, but there’s more to them than that. The quintet has only been around for a little over a year, and already they are breaking ground in the indie folk circuit as one of the latest hot commodities. With tight harmonies, soaring instrumental bridges, and a knack for developing earworm melodies across a broad scope of musical styles, it isn’t much of a wonder why that is.
  
“We chose this collection of songs as a sampler of our sound, and responses to our folk, pop, and psych rock influences are apparent throughout. They were also the four most polished at the time we decided to record an EP, which took place at the humble home of Bud Carroll in Huntington, West Virginia,” lead vocalist and guitarist Ryan Anderson says.

“Simply put, Bud has a killer ear for what works and what clashes, and his appreciation for raw honesty and space between the parts really benefited us to honing in on our sound. The fun hasn’t let up since we left the mountains exhausted and so full of love and fast food.”

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