Blurt emerges out of Harp's ashes

by Jason Gross

6 May 2008

 

From the people who brought you Harp, this press release:

BLURT is coming. Scott Crawford, founder of HARP, along with Managing Editor Fred Mills and Senior Editor Randy Harward, will unveil BLURT digital magazine and the accompanying BLURT-online website in June. In addition to the Joan As Police Woman cover story, artists featured in the BLURT debut will include My Morning Jacket, Ray Davies, My Brightest Diamond, Sally Shapiro and many others.

Brought to you by the creative team behind the lauded HARP magazine (called “America’s best music magazine” by NPR’s Bob Boilen and “the best music magazine in the country and the one that musicians always read” by Foo Fighter Dave Grohl), BLURT will raise the bar for online modern music and entertainment magazines by combining insightful interviews, dozens of no-holds-barred reviews, and top-notch design standards. Its green-minded, digital-only format will set the standard for how digi-magazines can heighten the consumer experience by offering fully interactive content including videos, MP3s, podcasts and more. The publication will be available free 10 times annually at Blurt-online.com

“While the print world continues to struggle, launching a magazine in this format allows us to explore the music community just as comprehensively but without many of the handicaps that burdened HARP,” says Editor-in-Chief Scott Crawford. “It’s a new world out there, but creatively, I’ve never been more excited about the possibilities.” 

The digi-mag will be hosted at Blurt-online.com — soon to be an essential one-stop for enthusiastic music and culture fans with exclusive content including daily news and concert reviews, humor, industry insider and political blogs, exclusive videos and interviews, podcasts, hundreds of reviews, and much, much more. Prepare yourself: Blurt-online goes live this June.
 

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