Decomposure, They Might Be Giants, Wyclef Jean...

by PopMatters Staff

5 December 2007

 

Decomposure
Hour 1 [MP3]
     

Hour 2 [MP3]
     

 

Vertical Lines A began in earnest back in 2005 with a mostly uneventful Friday field-recorded across a stack of 23 hour-long cassettes, each one tagged with a number corresponding to its order of recording. Once committed to tape, I began the process of deconstructing that day and recompiling the fragments into music, one cassette at a time. This is where the titles come from—each song’s sound source material is drawn from the corresponding cassette. And save for a few notable moments, all the album’s music is drawn from the cassettes; it’s mostly devoid of actual instrumentation and nearly all of it is either diced moments from the cassettes or my voice. And exactly a year later, after a detailed process of digitally slicing, sifting, layering and interpreting, Vertical Lines A sat there blinking and awake. So, as you listen to each minute go by, you’re not only hearing the music itself, but also 11 condensed hours in field recordings, and a year’s worth of thought and effort. While Vertical Lines A is fully autonomous as its own creature, it’s actually just one solidified half of an eventual two-album project, the second half still phantom.” -– Caleb Mueller, Decomposure

They Might Be Giants
Friday Night Family Podcast [MP3]

Junk Science
Hey! [MP3]
     

Nicolay
Tight Eyes [Streaming]

Pela
KEXP CMJ In-Studio MP3 [MP3]
     

Wyclef Jean
Sweetest Girl (REMIX) feat. Raekwon, Akon, Lil Wayne

Radiohead
Jigsaw Falling Into Place

 

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