'Inside' and the Monstrosity of Collectivism

by G. Christopher Williams

23 August 2017

(Playdead) 
cover art

Inside

US: 29 Jun 2016

It has been a year since the release of Inside, Playdead’s follow up to the cult classic Limbo. When I reviewed Inside last June, I talked about its themes but avoided spoiling the game’s ending, so it feels like it has been enough time now to consider that ending and how the game concludes with the embrace of a monstrous embodied form of collectivism.

The little boy that serves as the protagonist of Inside certainly stands out in the washed-out world of Inside. His bright red shirt marks him as unique in a world of muddy gray and starker black and white. This signals his individualism, his heroism, in the game.

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