Less music on the web thanks to major labels?

by Jason Gross

12 July 2007

 

Thanks again for all the smart responses to my classical posting- I have some more thoughts to add here but first, I wanted to address something really galling.  Unfortunately, the title says it all: Web DJs silenced by royalty fees.  All this to squeeze more money out of other sources because profits are down at major labels?  This stupid, short-sighted disastrous policy is not only going to hurt music fans, it’s also going to hurt labels, publishers and ultimately artists too.  With less stations out there, that means that there are less opportunities for artists to get exposure and less money coming in from these broadcasters since they’re going to shut down and then not have to pay any licensing fees.  And guess where music fans are going to flock to more than ever to hear music?  The P2P downloading services that the majors are fighting against.  If the music industry as we knew it is indeed dying off (I think it is), the majors only have themselves to blame for not only dragging their tail on technology and mounting wrong-headed lawsuits but also using tactics like this which kill over promotion sources for their artists.  With all of this wrong-headed and catastrophic decision making as well as idiotic stubbornness, I’m beginning to think that these guys are also putting together Bush’s Iraq war policy.

But now there’s late breaking word that the labels and their minions might have come to their senses: seethis Wired article for details

 

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