Passport to Stockholm - "Better Days" (audio) (premiere)

by Sarah Zupko

1 April 2016

London indie folk ensemble Passport to Stockholm knows their way around a hook. The group creates memorable, pristine, addictive folk pop.
 

London indie folk ensemble Passport to Stockholm knows their way around a hook. The group creates memorable, pristine, addictive folk pop. Chris “Barney” Barnard and Tom Piggott have been playing music together since they were teenagers and they formed Passport to Stockholm and promptly added percussionist Henri Grimes and classically-trained cellist Mariona De Lamo. These four musicians belong together as you’ll hear on their new single “Better Days”, which is underpinned with gorgeous cello lines below crystal clear harmonies and a chorus that Bastille would kill for.
  
The band tells us that it’s “a song about reassuring someone that you love that everything is going to be OK in the end—even though right now it feels like the world is against you—and you’re going to be there for that person every step of the way until the storm has passed and they come out the other side.”

Passport to Stockholm might want to get visas for the world because their sound is universal and it should take them far and wide. Their new EP releases April 29th via Ingrooves.

TOUR DATES
April 3rd: London (Sofar Sounds)
April 6th: Guildford GLive
April 15th: London (Boston Music Room)
April 19th: Manchester (Eagle Inn)
April 20th: Leeds (Headrow House)
April 21st: Liverpool (The Pilgrim)
April 22nd: Banbury (Also Known As)

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