Remembering Solzhenitsyn

by Nikki Tranter

4 August 2008

 

Though it’s all over the news media today, I’m recommending checking out The Australian‘s piece on the passing of Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Alongside a straightforward obituary is a 16-page photo album featuring images of the reclusive author thoughout his long life, from his days in the Soviet Army to his exile in Vermont up until his 80th birthday celebrations at Moscow’s Theatre Na Taganke. It provides a full picture of an artist and his time.

For a comprehensive investigation into the author’s life and work, visit today’s Guardian:

His wife, Natalya, told Interfax that her husband, who suffered along with millions of Russians in the prison camp system, died as he had hoped to die. “He wanted to die in the summer - and he died in the summer,” she said. “He wanted to die at home - and he died at home. In general I should say that Alexander Isaevich lived a difficult but happy life.”

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