Stolar - "Paralyzed" (video) (premiere)

by Sarah Zupko

20 February 2017

Soulful electropop artist Stolar finds his ultimate comfort in music, a place where he can confront his demons directly and honestly and maybe we can too.
Photo: Myriam Santos 

Pop artist Stolar finds the worldly confines of the Big Apple to be the perfect setting for composing his music with its endless sources of inspiration. Stolar’s sound is utterly warm and contemporary, based in pop, but further refined by his soul and electronic leanings. Soulful electropop, if you will. His latest song, “Paralyzed”, tackles the feeling of being mentally and physically blocked when confronted with the “paralyzing” effects of daily stress, fear, and unease. Like so many fine songwriters before him, Stolar finds his ultimate comfort in music, a place where he can confront his demons directly and honestly and maybe we can too.
  
Stolar tells PopMatters that “for ‘Paralyzed’ we wanted to create a visual that captured the feeling of being completely overwhelmed. When director Kevin Slack (the Gaslight Anthem, Shawn Mendes, Hailee Steinfeld) brought us the concept of shooting a video in reverse and using slow motion to capture two people being frozen, we immediately jumped on board. Kevin and I worked together to ensure the video had the perfect balance of a dream and subtle narrative. The end product honestly blew my mind. “Paralyzed” is meant to feel like a three-minute film about pushing through the fear of the unknown. The final cut captures that uncannily.”

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