Tarwater, Immaculate Machine

by PopMatters Staff

13 May 2007

 

Immaculate Machine —"Dear Confessor "
From Fables on Mint
While traditional fables are simplistic and moralizing, Immaculate Machine’s Fables is an open-ended series of vignettes based on the idea that our lives are stories. These tales of travel and mischief leave plenty of room for listener interpretation. The energetic Victoria based trio formed in 2002 and released two CDs independently before signing to Mint Records. Their critically acclaimed debut Mint album, Ones and Zeros, was released in 2004.

Tarwater —"A Marriage in Belmont"
From Spider Smile on Morr Music
It’s the sound, not the song. At least at the beginning. Bernd Jestram and Ronald Lippok sit in their recording studio located in the heart of their city and turn the knobs, press the buttons, shift the regulators. Until they find a sound, until a sound finds its way to them. A rhythm, a melody, a noise. “Then, we slowly write the song afterwards.” For Spider Smile, Tarwater have found astonishing decided pop songs. They, the electro duo, each of them with his roots in East-Berlin’s sub culture and avant-garde. Their songs being full of allusions and references shall encourage the listener to link his/her own stories with the ones by Tarwater.

Benni Hemm Hemm —"snjórjljóssnjór"
From Kajak on Morr Music
So much time didn’t go by. And quick it was, too. Not only the sounds and texts for Benni Hemm Hemm’s second album Kajak were written within a few, concentrated weeks. The recordings in Sundlaugin, the studio of Sigur Rós, were also done within only four days. During four magical days eleven musicians recorded thirteen vibrating tracks. With kettledrums and trumpets, with guitars, trombones and a glockenspiel. Emotionally, energetically, emphatically. An insistent shining. Warm and visible already from a distance.

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