The Five Best (And Five Worst) Super Bowl Commercials of 2016

by Jessy Krupa

8 February 2016

There were touchdowns and fumbles in this year's mostly lackluster crop of ads, plus one commercial that left us conflicted.
 

This past Sunday marked the 50th anniversary of the Super Bowl, but the popularity of the Super Bowl ad—a memorable, attention-grabbing commercial that advertisers pay massive amounts of money for—is a relatively recent phenomenon.

You could easily say that this year’s offerings were among the worst yet, with too many ad-makers cobbling together the same cliches of past successes (celebrity cameos, major special effects, cute animals, etc.) in ways that felt unoriginal and boring.

Still there were some commercials that probably put a smile on your face, so here is PopMatters countdown of the five best in show.
  
THE BEST

5. Honda Ridgeline - “A New Truck to Love”

This clip features a flock of sheep singing Queen’s “Somebody to Love”. That’s really all you need to know.

 

4. Doritos - “Doritos Dogs”

Continuing the oft-used theme of cute animals doing funny things is a look at a pack of dogs who are willing to go through a lot for their favorite snack. This commercial gets bonus points for not being dreamed up by an ad executive, but by a contest winner instead.

 

3. Coca-Cola - “Coke Mini (Hulk Vs. Ant-Man)

If there is only one 2016 Super Bowl commercial that will be remembered years from now, it’s this one, which stars Marvel superheroes Ant-Man and the Hulk.

 

2. Subaru - “Subaru Dog Tested (Puppy)”

The car maker continued their popular “dog tested” series with this sweet spot, in which a doting golden retriever parent helps its puppy fall sleep.

 

1. Apartments.com “Moving Day #MovinOnUp”

Jeff Goldbloom stars in this Jeffersons-themed ad that also features Lil’ Wayne and a fake seagull. It’s over-the-top and completely ridiculous, with a little hint of nostalgia, like most Super Bowl commercials should be.

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