'The Glassblower's Children' Explores the Existential Melancholia of the Child's World

by Imran Khan

12 April 2017

 
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The Glassblower's Children

Maria Gripe

(New York Review of Books)
US: Mar 2014

The fabled realism of Maria Gripe’s The Glassblower’s Children (originally published in Sweden in 1964) offers a tale at once strange and all too familiar. The Swedish author made a living writing children’s novels that borrowed heavily from the fantastic lore of Nordic myth; stories which detailed the striking dynamism and power of Norse gods and the lessons learned by mere mortals.

Her stories were often deceptively plaintive. They hid a wealth of darker truths which brewed just beneath the crust of her mannered language.

The Glassblower's Children

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