Trailer Trash Tracys - "Siebenkäs" (Singles Going Steady)

by PopMatters Staff

9 August 2017

Dream pop filtered through a tropical island, Trailer Trash Tracys' latest manages to incorporate plenty of pop hooks into an arrangement that recalls the early '80s.
Photo: Amanda Fordyce 

Adriane Pontecorvo: There’s a lot to unpack on new Trailer Trash Tracys single “Siebenkäs”, from the name (the title of an 18th century German novel) to the glowing white ball featured prominently in the video (the group cites Woody Allen’s Sleeper as inspiration) to the music itself, an almost surreal mixture of many things. The vocals sound like ‘90s Britpop, the synths sound like a dream, and the percussion is abundant—but still gentle. Tropical woodiness, Latin rhythms, and a transcendent lightness give the track the legs it needs to keep moving forward, but nothing weighs down the Tracys here. Utterly unique, and a track you can overthink, though it’s much easier if you just float right along with it. [9/10]
  

Chris Ingalls: Dream pop filtered through a tropical island, Trailer Trash Tracys’ latest manages to incorporate plenty of pop hooks into an arrangement that recalls the early ‘80s when everyone from Blondie to Haircut 100 to Culture Club seemed obsessed with giving their singles a faint reggae vibe. Fortunately, there’s a bit of an experimental tilt to this track that keeps things interesting and lets it stick out from the rest of the pack. [7/10]

Jordan Blum: I like how the video plays with conventions and expectations from the start (turning the moon into a drum). From there, it turns into an avant-garde indie drama whose visuals are mysterious but complementary to the music. As for the track itself, it’s certainly fresh in terms of vocals, percussion, and strings—so I respect it on a technical level—but it’s not very interesting as a song. I hear a bit of Dreaming-era Kate Bush, though, so it gets an extra point or two just for that, and there’s no denying its majestic timbres and engagingly unconventional arrangement. [7/10]

Spyros Stasis: This feels like a blast from the past, as it has been five years since Trailer Trash Tracys last released music. However, not much seems to have changed for the London based indie/dream pop band, who fill their new track “Siebenkas” with an array of different instruments and establish a lucid ambiance to surround them. On the plus side, the different elements of the mix work together, complimenting each other nicely and displaying an adventurous and open perspective by the band, but other than that the track simply does not have much more to offer. [6/10]

Chris Thiessen: The ideas here are really good. The percussive experimental dream pop track sounds uplifting and hits on starting new beginnings. However, for such a percussion-focused song, it feels so buried in the mix and loses its impact. [5/10]

Ian Rushbury: First off, Trailer Trash Tracys is a great name for a pop group. It starts off like an out-take from “Stomp” and settles into a floaty, percussion heavy groove. At 5.20, it might outstay its welcome a little, but there’s almost enough to keep your attention. It’s nice to hear something dreamy and atmospheric which isn’t completely drowned in over-effected guitars or washes of synth-pad noises. Very intriguing. [7/10]

John Garratt: Without the orb bouncing randomly around the sets, this song is remarkably easy to tune out while listening to it. You pretty much get the whole picture early on and things just repeat from there. [4/10]

SCORE: 6.43

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