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Viewer Discretion Advised: 3 March, 2007

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Thursday, Mar 1, 2007


When the calendar changes over to a new month, it’s like Christmas for the film fan – figuratively and literally. The anticipation of new movie arrivals on the premium pay channels. The hope that certain motion picture prayers have been or will be answered. The nerve-racking wait as the weekly schedule is released. The utter disappointment when it turns out that, this time around, cinematic Santa Claus is delivering coal, not glad tiding of film viewing joy. Still, there are a few choice sugar plums among the wool socks and dress slacks being screened this weekend, including the premiere of one of 2005’s best films. Naturally, it is featured as SE&L‘s pick for 3 March:


Premiere Pick
V for Vendetta


When it was announced that the Wachowski Brothers, hot off their success with the Matrix movies, would next tackle Alan Moore’s newfangled 1984, the sizable sonic boom emanating from the cinematic nerd contingent was deafening. Then they learned that James McTeigue, not the siblings themselves, would be behind the lens. Suddenly, the fan fires cooled. And then the movie’s opening was nearly pushed back when events stunningly similar to those in Moore’s graphic novel occurred all over London. As a result, many predicted this pointed political commentary would fail to generate much motion picture interest. Surprisingly, it ended up being one of 2005’s best films. While the small screen may lessen some of the story’s sizeable impact, this visually arresting offering speaks volumes about our current social status – and the threats that lie both without, and within. (3 March, Cinemax, 10PM EST)

Additional Choices
Poseidon


Somewhere in the inner sanctum of the great studio think tanks, this was a real no-brainer. Remake the classic disaster movie using up to date technology and computer generated special effects. The results should be spectacular. Well, the visuals were kind of interesting, and some of the stunt work was stellar. Too bad the acting and storyline were weak and waterlogged. (3 March, HBO, 8PM EST)

Stick It


In the grand tradition of Bring It On and…ummm…Bring It On Again, comes this gymnastics based take on the rebellious teen/team sport metaphor. When a surly snot nose returns to her hometown, she finds herself face to face with the drearily detached Jeff Bridges. He’s the coach who will impart some slightly slack life lessons. She will learn squad spirit. In the end, the title suggests the movie’s viability as entertainment. (3 March, Starz, 9PM EST)


Halloween H20


As Rob Zombie continues the near impossible task of reinventing this once venerable horror franchise, here’s a chance to see someone else’s attempted take on the material. In this case, the one time hot Kevin Scream Williamson oversees the production, bringing Michael Myers face to face with his long lost sister Laurie. Interesting for those looking for narrative closure, but that’s about it. (3 March, ShowToo, 8PM EST)

Indie Pick
I Heart Huckabees


For a while, it looked like David O. Russell would become one of Hollywood’s top shelf filmmakers. Then the writer/director started letting his ego drive his projects. After the terrific triumvirate that was Spanking the Monkey, Flirting with Disaster and Three Kings, Russell wandered over into metaphysical territory for his next project, the perplexing insular I Heart Huckabees. Featuring a cast most artists would die for and a wealth of psychobabble inspiration, this could have been a clever, biting interpersonal satire. Instead, many of the jokes are jerryrigged to an ideal that Russell wasn’t sharing with his audience. We frequently feel lost in a dreary dramedy without a map, a firm fictional foundation, or a clue. Maybe time has smoothed over some of the harsher edges. Whatever the case, this is one failure that’s definitely worth a look. (5 March, IFC, 9PM EST)

Additional Choices
Narc


The celebrity ride has been so manic for Joe Carnahan that he must have the world’s worst case of career whiplash. First he’s a noted nobody. Then this film launches him into the realm of potential industry player. Five years later, his Smokin’ Aces tanks at the box office and now he’s back to peddling his scriptwriting wares. To see where it all stared, check out this excellent cop drama.  (4 March, IFC, 9PM EST)

Havoc


Usually known for her heated documentaries (Harlan County USA), director Barbara Kopple took a rare excursion into fiction filmmaking to tell this story of two suburban gals who get in over their heads while trying to score some drugs. Before you know it, cultures and crime collide. Sadly, this over hyped effort is all shill and no substance, promoting its strong sexual content and nudity over its storyline. (5 March, Sundance, 12AM EST)

The Basketball Diaries


Before it went MIA a few years back (thanks to a scene that some felt was too close to the events at Columbine) Leonardo DiCaprio’s take on Jim Carroll’s acclaimed memoir was a well received effort for the young actor. Slowly making its way back to the small screen some 11 years later, it is definitely worth a look. A bit too stylized perhaps, but the performances all around are excellent. (9 March, Sundance, 10PM EST)

Outsider Option
The Return of the Secaucus 7


When it premiered 27 year ago, no one thought it would be a hit. It featured a cast of complete unknowns, was created by a man who made his money doctoring scripts for the likes of Roger Corman, and consisted almost entirely of baby boomers sitting around, talking. Of course, when Lawrence Kasdan “borrowed” the idea for his own generational yakfest, 1983’s The Big Chill, the mostly name actors helped sell the concept to a conversation-wary audience. What makes Secaucus superior to that baffling Yuppie scumbucket is that Sayles is more interested in people than problems. He wants us to sympathize with the wayward lives of these determinedly decent individuals, not worry who’s going to hook up over alcohol and Motown music cues. Indeed, this indie is much more endearing than its Tinsel Town counterpart. (4 March, Flix, 8PM EST)

Additional Choices
Three O’Clock High


Back when the teen comedy was the genre du jour of the ‘80s entertainment industry, this sly and clever film was a witty reimagining of the standard high school stereotypes. Combining a riff on High Noon with all the typical adolescent angst and social stigmas, what seemed rather radical 20 years ago plays perfectly today. Besides, this is the film that brought Phil Joanou to the forefront – if just for a little while. (5 March, Encore, 7:30PM EST)

The Age of Innocence


As the fanbase continues to bask in the warm, welcome glow of Martin Scorsese’s recent Oscar win, here’s a chance to revisit one of his earlier masterworks. While some may find it hard to believe that the man who created Raging Bull and Goodfellas can handle pure period drama, the American auteur delivers an amazing motion picture experience, one definitely worthy of his considerable directorial skill. (6 March, Movieplex, 9PM EST)

Kiss Me Deadly


It’s odd that, in our current cinematic frame of mind, more studios aren’t greenlighting movies based on the works of Mickey Spillane. After all, he’s Quentin Tarantino without the geek boy glare, and his tough as nails narratives would play perfectly for a generation raised on the Hong Kong school of crime storytelling. While not the best example of the man’s manic machismo, this 1955 effort is a good place to start. (6 March, Turner Classic Movies, 12AM EST)

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