Courtney Jaye

The Exotic Sounds of Courtney Jaye

by Steve Horowitz

7 February 2010

 

Bongos and Banjos

cover art

The Exotic Sounds of Courtney Jaye

(Tropicali)
US: 3 Nov 2009

Courtney Jaye does something sweet and wonderful on her country-music-goes-Hawaiian mash-up. She finds the common sensibility at the heart of both genres, not just in the instrumentation (lap steel guitars) and lilting melodies but in the genuine loopiness that comes out of just being sincere. Jaye’s narrators aren’t afraid to get down an beg for love (“Sometimes Always”), drown their sorrows in cheap alcohol (“Box Wine”), or kick themselves for being stupid (“Queen of Sabotage”). They know the present may suck, but time is always on their side. Jaye’s got the girl-grown-up kind of vocals that make her sound like a woman who hasn’t lost her sense of still believing in love and life as a grand adventure. She complements this impression by having the unusual accompaniment (e.g, bongos and banjos) born out of the mix of musical styles. The careful listener can always hear something mysterious happening in the mix.

The Exotic Sounds of Courtney Jaye

Rating:

 

We all know how critical it is to keep independent voices alive and strong on the Internet. Please consider a donation to support our work as independent cultural critics and historians. Your donation will help PopMatters stay viable through these changing and challenging times. Thanks everyone.

//comments
//related
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Violin Virtuoso L. Subramaniam Mesmerizes in Rare New York Performance (Photos)

// Notes from the Road

"Co-presented by the World Music Institute, the 92Y hosted a rare and mesmerizing performance from India's violin virtuoso L. Subramaniam.

READ the article