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Extended Loudspeakers

(Sub Rosa; US: 29 Sep 2009; UK: 9 Nov 2009)

For Extended Loudspeakers, Pierre Berthet suspended tin cans, linked them by wires, put a loudspeaker in one can, and caught the sounds made from the vibration of the wires. The album has the air of a science project to it as much as a musical work. Knowing what he did to get these sounds may help you appreciate and think about it, though one might prefer listening without prior knowledge. Either way, one might have trouble connecting to Extended Loudspeakers on a level beyond an appreciation of its mechanics.


At first, It sounds like interplay among clanging noises, like a metallic conversation listeners can’t participate in. Repeated listens reveal how the repetition becomes a scene in itself, as more atmosphere comes to life. Part five (of seven) has just a whirring sound. It’s such a break from the previous sounds it feels like a death or a new start. The clanging begins again on the next track, but the feeling is different, or are we the ones who have changed?

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Dave Heaton has been writing about music on a regular basis since 1993, first for unofficial college-town newspapers and DIY fanzines and now mostly on the Internet. In 2000, the same year he started writing for PopMatters, he founded the online arts magazine ErasingClouds.com, still around but often in flux. He writes music reviews for the print magazine The Big Takeover. He is a music obsessive through and through. He lives in Kansas City, Missouri.


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