Sones de México Ensemble

Fiesta Mexicana: Mexican Songs & Stories for Niños & Niñas

by Deanne Sole

28 April 2010

Put together in the hope that your child will pick up a few facts about Mexico and structured to ensure that it will get some exercise.
 
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Sones de México Ensemble

Fiesta Mexicana

Mexican Songs & Stories for Niños & Niñas and their Papás & Mamás

(Sones de México Ensemble, Inc.)
US: 6 Apr 2010
UK: Import

Put together in the hope that your child will pick up a few facts about Mexico and structured to ensure that it will get some exercise, Fiesta Mexicana is the album version of a show that has been running in the US since 1994. It sprouted in Illinois and went on to tour the country’s schools. The Sones de México Ensemble has been there from the start. Do we know what language the people in Mexico speak? it wonders. Would we like to mimic a buzzard, a cat, an iguana? Would we like to dance our way through Aztec mythology? The myths sound like André Breton morality tales. “The people of this world were giants. They ate so many acorns that they collapsed on the earth and were devoured by tigers.” We duck down to the ground, we leap up, we “dance like a turkey”. A live audience of children laughs in the background. The child-management side of things seems to be good—I say this without having a child around to test it on—the prompts are clear, and the adults don’t barge ahead with their answers before they’ve given the kids at home a chance to supply answers themselves. “If you said Spanish, you are correct!”

Fiesta Mexicana

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