Silverstein

Rescue

by Kiel Hauck

23 June 2011

 
cover art

Silverstein

Rescue

(Hopeless)
US: 26 Apr 2011
UK: 26 Apr 2011

Anyone under the impression that Canadian post-hardcore outfit Silverstein is a one-trick pony needs look no further than the band’s latest release, Rescue. The second half of the album kicks off with the pummeling sound of “The Artist” before the band does their best Rise Against impression with “Burning Hearts” and then transitions to the poppy “Darling Harbour”. Other tracks like “Live to Kill” and “Sacrifice” harness Silverstein’s Discovering the Waterfront-era screamo sound without feeling as though the band is re-hashing old material.

Perhaps the recent transition from longtime label Victory to their new home at Hopeless has breathed new life into a band that seemed on the brink of becoming mired in all-too-familiar formulas. Sure, Rescue is filled with nods to the band’s past work, but this collection of songs feels more ambitious, more expansive in sound and more exciting. “Texas Mickey” captures this revitalization with some of the most beautiful guitar work in Silverstein’s catalogue, and the guest vocals from Bayside’s Anthony Raneri aren’t too shabby either. All the while, Shane Told’s sing/scream transitions sound as crisp and effortless as ever.

I’m a firm believer that the final chapter in the book of screamo was written in 2004 when Underoath released They’re Only Chasing Safety.  However, a small number of bands has continued to carry that torch in an effort to find places for innovation and elbow room for fresh sounds without coming off as cheesy or hollow. Silverstein is one of those bands, and with Rescue, they’ve crafted another great record.

Rescue

Rating:

//related
We all know how critical it is to keep independent voices alive and strong on the Internet. Please consider a donation to support our work. We are a wholly independent, women-owned, small company. Your donation will help PopMatters stay viable through these changing, challenging times where costs have risen and advertising has dropped precipitously. PopMatters needs your help to keep publishing. Thank you.


//comments
//Mixed media
//Blogs

How a Song By Unknown Newcomer Adam Johnston Ended Up on Blondie's New Album

// Sound Affects

"Adam Johnston of An Unkindness wrote a song at 17 years old and posted it online. Two years later, magic happened.

READ the article