The Civil Tones

City Stoopin'

by David Maine

11 October 2011

 

Infectiously energetic instrumentals

cover art

The Civil Tones

City Stoopin'

(Pravda)
US: 12 Jul 2011
UK: Import

The Civil Tones is a quartet of multi-instrumentalists who play a faintly jazzy, solidly bluesy, intermittently boppy form of instrumental music that falls somewhere in the intersections of those genres. Using a simple template of guitars, keyboards, bass and drums, with occasional variation (notably brass and a variety of percussion sounds), the band has managed to create the soundtrack for a perfect summer afternoon. Much of it sounds vaguely familiar, but good luck pointing to this or that band, or song, or influence.

Opener “Soul to Go” is built upon an irrepressibly bouncy vibe and benefits from a ripping organ solo. “The Scrambler” is every bit as energetic as its title suggests, while “How’d Ya Like to Be King” is apt to have all but the dullest listener tapping along. At thirteen tracks, there’s plenty more where these three songs come from.  The news isn’t all good, however. By the second half of the album, some tunes start to blur together. Still. there’s plenty to like on this record, and for the most part the band makes the effort to inject new sounds at regular intervals. Listeners who aren’t wedded to the idea that vocals are an ironclad requirement in compelling music might wish to lend an ear.

City Stoopin'

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