Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

Music
cover art

Sean Rowe

Magic

(Anti-; US: 22 Feb 2011; UK: 21 Feb 2011)

Magic is like a mix tape of dark folk and gloomy icons. There’s nothing original about Sean Rowe, as he plunders the songbooks of his favorite artists and imitates them to the best of his ability. This isn’t a terrible album, but it is annoying, and would be much more potent if his influences weren’t so apparent. “Wrong Side of the Bed” is Nick Cave vs. Tom Waits. “Time to Think” is Lambchop vs. Leonard Cohen. “Surprise” is Jeff Buckley vs. Bruce Springsteen. You get the picture. The pool of singer-songwriters is ever-expanding. In order to set yourself apart, you have to find your own, unique, original voice. Rowe obviously hasn’t, and has a long way to go.

Rating:

Stephen Rowland has been founding and contributing to numerous underground film and music publications for the last 12 years. In addition to critiquing images and sounds, he makes no money as a regional historian and preservationist, co-authoring "Postcard History Series: Alameda" and "Images of America: Alameda," available from Arcadia Publishing.


Related Articles
27 Nov 2012
Sean Rowe's latest is a somber and lonely voyage worth losing yourself in. The Salesman and the Shark exudes the grays of life.
19 Sep 2012
Finding a unique juxtaposition between his love of music and his love of nature, Sean Rowe is finding that he can stand out just by being himself, and tells PopMatters all about his journey to his latest album, The Salesman and the Shark ...
Comments
Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.