The Good Intentions

Someone Else's Time

by Stephen Haag

12 December 2011

Americana-loving Brits tackle classic country tropes with a keen, writerly eye on this latest beaut of a disc.
 
cover art

The Good Intentions

Someone Else's Time

(Boronda)
US: 2 Aug 2011
UK: 15 Nov 2011

I know No Depression has morphed from a late, great magazine to a thriving online community, but it just ain’t the same. For one thing, the two guys and a gal who make up the British trio the Good Intentions will never get a “Town and Country” write-up in the venerable alt-country mag, and their classicist take on the last fifty years of country would’ve made a perfect fit, too (The band recently won “Americana Act of the Year” at the 2011 British Country Music Awards). Led by thistle-sharp songwriter Peter Davies, the trio tackles all the classic country/folk tropes—trains, booze, fatalistic coal miners, the devil—with a keen, writerly eye. With a rich sound full of pedal and lap steel guitars, mandolins, fiddles, accordions and warm harmonies courtesy of band mates, Gabrielle Monk and Francesco Roskell, plus nearly a dozen musical friends, Davies runs the gamut from clever wordplay (“Dying on the vine was never the plan” goes the gently swinging “Everybody Loves A Drinking Man”) to hopeful truth (“Western Lullaby”‘s “At the end of every journey is a place that you belong”) with an organic quality and a sincerity that never feels like shtick (unlike, say, fellow travelers Blanche). Honest, true and plainspoken, Someone Else’s Time is the kind of album that deserves to find an appreciative post-No Depression audience.

Someone Else's Time

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