Lincoln Durham

The Shovel Vs.the Howling Bones

by Jedd Beaudoin

29 January 2012

 

Lincoln Durham: The Shove Vs. The Howling Bones

cover art

Lincoln Durham:

The Shovel [vs] the Howling Bones

(Rayburn Publishing)
US: 31 Jan 2012
UK: Import

Lincoln Durham’s songs are rough around the edges, informed by the history of American roots music—folk and country and blues—as well as rock ‘n’ roll’s loose and lewd energy and attitude. Never mind the comparisons likely to tumble forth, Durham’s material speaks for itself, namely pieces such as “Mud Puddles”, on which Durham tempers the sweltering sweetness of the south with a dash of desirable wickedness, and “Drifting Wood”, a track about as dirty and pointed as can be. Elsewhere, “Clementine” and “Trucker’s Love Song” offer a glimpse of Durham’s quieter side. Those moments are great and all but it’s the loud ones—and there are plenty of those—that will keep you coming back for more.

The Shovel [vs] the Howling Bones

Rating:

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