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Keller Williams

Bass

(Sci Fidelity; US: 13 Dec 2011; UK: Import)

Jam band freak returns.

On the 17th album by Virginia’s own eccentric oddball, Keller Williams, he decides to try something different. For the first time ever, there is absolutely no guitar heard at all; all Keller plays is bass with a keyboardist and drummer backing him up. From the very first track, the album is a much mellower affair than Keller’s previous records. It’s surprising to see him so mellow, but after years of humorous tracks and epic-length live jams, it’s rewarding to hear something different. With the longest song topping out at just short of seven minutes, it’s the change of pace that makes this album more interesting for the uninitiated. Scattered amongst the other tracks, a Beck cover and a superb version of Morphine’s “Buena” really show what Keller’s capabilities.  In the end, some people may say this is just another Keller album but they’re not listening close enough.

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26 Feb 2012
The second set is only six songs, but this means the band is jamming out and that's what everyone is here for.
20 Feb 2012
Like the best jam bands, Keller's influences extend far and wide. This enables the master craftsman to pull a variety of tricks out of his musical hat.
1 Feb 2011
Fans are definitely on a first name basis with the modern-day improvisational troubadour. His laid-back vibe and amicable demeanor make him seem more like just another music fan than any kind of rock star.
17 Feb 2010
If Keller Williams had lived in medieval times, there's no doubt he would have been one of the most in-demand troubadours of the age.
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