Maïa Vidal

God Is My Bike

by Deanne Sole

4 November 2012

 
cover art

Maïa Vidal

God Is My Bike

(Crammed Discs)
US: 30 Oct 2012
UK: 31 Oct 2011

She does a Rancid cover so sweetly that I didn’t know it was a Rancid cover—the opening thrash of “It’s Quite Alright” tinkling out of a glockenspiel. That communal shout is drawn back into privacy. The aim of this album, she’s said, was to create an enclosed world-of-one, and she foregrounds the diminutive instruments, recorders, toy pianos, or something larger, but the sound is still personal-portable, like an accordion playing a creaky cafe waltz. She sings in a murmur, discussing a narrator’s experiences in the lyrics: this is how I feel, this is how I behave, this is what I see. But the musician and the narrator are not the same person, and as you listen, you realise that the musician is critical of her creation. Musicians with very personal styles may have influenced her, or was it a coincidence when “Follow Me” began and I thought of Camille?

God Is My Bike

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