Lorenzo Senni

Quantum Jelly

by Craig Hayes

26 November 2012

 
cover art

Lorenzo Senni

Quantum Jelly

(Editions Mego)
US: 8 Oct 2012
UK: 8 Oct 2012

On Quantum Jelly Italian avant-inquisitor Lorenzo Senni pays homage to the bleep/bloop joys of ‘90s trance by deconstructing the genre to its singular pulsating root. Utilizing nothing more than a JP8000 Roland digital/analog synthesizer, Senni takes real-time two-channel digital recordings, stopping only to tidy up any MIDI errors, and repeats a singular musical theme focused on the build up rather than the burn. Essentially, Quantum Jelly is simply a collection of percussive beeps—a incremental series of glitches filtered via Senni’s background in the experimental and noise scenes. The difference between tracks centers on scattered mechanic melodies and an increasing pace, but the building blocks of rave have been laid bare. Senni’s goal is to draw attention to Euro trance’s characteristic tropes, and by repeating the same blips ad infinitum he certainly achieves that. If you’re a fan of repetitious blurts and pieces, then Quantum Jelly is set to appeal. The only downside of course is that none of the album’s tracks provide any sense of a heaving dance-floor payoff. Clearly, that is the point, but keep in mind that Quantum Jelly is foreplay, not fornication.

Quantum Jelly

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