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Dirty Projectors

About to Die EP

(Domino; US: 6 Nov 2012; UK: Import)

Swing Lo Magellan, Dirty Projectors’ latest full-length, rendered succinctness a virtue. Where the Brooklyn royalty’s previous work drew capital from generous, richly orchestrated buildups, a quick glance at Magellan‘s track lengths reveals the opposite.


A few months later comes this pithy offering—four tracks in 12 minutes, available online or on 12-inch vinyl cut at 45 RPM. Presumably borne from the same weirdly productive upstate New York sessions that spawned “70 new songs and beats”, About to Die offers a tight, effective encore for Magellan. Here, as on that record, the bulk of Projectors’ ornate eccentricities—the zigzagging harmonies, the time signatures, the squealing outbursts—are compressed and focused into uncharacteristically loose, almost minimalist indie-pop pieces.


The best of the bunch is the title track, a Magellan standout that could squarely have trumped “Gun Has No Trigger” for first-single status. With its stuttering handclap percussion and pitch-perfect call-and-response chorus (all together: “About to—diii-iiieee!”), the track aptly sums up Magellan‘s—and the EP’s—penchant for smart, self-contained art-pop snippets. At barely two minutes, “While You’re Here” makes for a sweet, sparsely arranged b-side. Singing alone, Longstreth croons a tribute to recently deceased TV on the Radio bassist over rising violin swells. “While you were here / You were alive”, he repeats, but then slips into third-person: “My friend is rising and shining again.”


There’s a looseness to Swing Lo Magellan, a ragged quality expressed in handclaps, studio chatter, and disarmingly straightforward arrangements. Though unremarkable by the band’s standards, “Here Till It Says I’m Not” and “Simple Request” highlight this aesthetic well. The former is the sort of breezy, harmony-driven guitar pop the group could toss off on demand, marked by sparse production that sounds positively by Bitte Orca standards. The latter is more rousing, like a rootsier, acoustic “Maybe That Was It”. Abrupt and full of casual, first-take strumming, the track ends as swiftly as it begins. Despite his name, Longstreth has made brevity his domain.

Rating:

Zach Schonfeld is an associate editor for PopMatters and a reporter for Newsweek. Previously, he was an editorial fellow at The Atlantic Wire and graduated from Wesleyan University, birthplace of Das Racist, MGMT, and the nineteenth-century respiration calorimeter, where he served as the editor of Wesleying, a popular student-life blog. In his spare time, he enjoys visiting presidential birthplaces and teaching his dog to tweet. In addition to PopMatters, his writing has appeared online at Rolling Stone, TIME, Consequence of Sound, The Nation, USA Today College, The Columbia Journalism Review, The Rumpus, Paste Magazine, and the Hartford Courant. He can be reached at zschonfeld(at)gmail(dot)com or on Twitter @zzzzaaaacccchhh.


Media
Dirty Projectors: About to Die
Related Articles
By PopMatters Staff
20 Sep 2012
Dirty Projectors have announced a new EP releasing November 6th featuring the "About to Die" track from Swing Lo Magellan, as well as three new songs. The video was written and directed by David Longstreth and produced by Pitchfork.TV.
29 Jul 2012
Dirty Projectors are playful, hummable, uncompromisingly eccentric, but also unmistakably tight in their musicianship.
8 Jul 2012
As ever, Dirty Projectors follow their own muse on Swing Lo Magellan. It's just that they do so by reining in their restless talents this time around.
By Matthew Fiander and Arnold Pan
28 Jun 2012
The record release schedule usually cools off as summer heats up, but this July offers its fair share of highly anticipated albums from across the musical spectrum.
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