Anansy Cissé

Mali Overdrive

by Deanne Sole

12 June 2014

 
cover art

Anansy Cissé

Mali Overdrive

(Tugboat)
US: 27 May 2014
UK: 26 May 2014

Anansy Cissé makes his voice thick and muzzy, though sometimes it zips up into an almost-falsetto. The guitar in “Sekou Amadou” is slowly violent. The songs themselves are not violent—they’re examples of that kind of pan-African pop song that asks people to stay respectable and knock off the warfare. His building blocks are mainly Malian, primarily northern Malian, plus rock. None of them are new, but the execution is king here, the guitar jutting slowly right and left and commanding attention without begging for it. A taste for Led Zeppelin doesn’t tempt him into showstopper crescendos. It keeps him rubbing around for fuzz. Cissé ran a recording studio in the north until religious extremists and civil war pushed him south to Bamako. He’s not much of a self-promoter and friends had to persuade him to submit his music to World Music Network’s international Battle of the Bands. Thence to Mali Overdrive. Send us all friends like that.

Mali Overdrive

Rating:

//comments
//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Last Gunfighter: Songwriter Guy Clark Passes Away at 74

// Sound Affects

"The man whose songs were recorded by Johnny Cash, Alan Jackson, Ricky Skaggs, David Allan Coe, The Highwaymen, and countless others succumbs to time’s cruel cue that the only token of permanence we have to offer are the effects of shared moments and memories.

READ the article