Suicide Note

Decline of the West

by Ron Hart

24 November 2008

 

Unless Fugazi stage a covert surprise on their longtime fans and ambush us with a brand new album on a Tuesday morning in the near future, allow Suicide Note to fill in the gap those sorely-missed DC post-hardcore heroes have left in modern music since 2001. Also factoring in such influences as Drive Like Jehu and My War-era Black Flag, the Kentucky quartet’s latest 10-song LP could have easily been released in 1988, back when hardcore exhibited an intelligence lost amongst the tribal tattoos and cookie monster vocals of today’s aimlessly-aggro spin on the culture. A most welcome breath of fresh air for a new generation of heads in dire need of an alternative.

Empty Rooms

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