Cheap Nothing

The Politics Of Existence/Women's Body Parts

by Jason MacNeil

12 January 2009

 

Oh dear me, what have we hear? Is Cheap Nothing living up to its name or trying for some jazzy, beatnik poetry garbage? Well, sadly it sounds like a bit of both. On “Class Warfare” the band sounds like they’re still in the garage and hoping to play outside on the sidewalk sometime soon. “The Future Business Leaders of America” is a mild improvement but hits its stride halfway through. Fortunately “Not My Fault” and “Die Live or Die” also comes across better than initially expected. Meanwhile “Death Tax” is a hokey but happy ditty that could come off the rails at any point. And “I Wanna Die” and “Nothing to Live For” do just that, sounding incredibly arty and asinine. If there’s a saving grace, songs from Women’s Body Parts are tighter and better, especially the Bowie-leaning “Go Bulls”, the funky “Taffy” and the David Byrne-ish “Chlamydia” but “Glenda” is an acquired taste. “The Better Bobby” also shines with its slow but moody framework.

The Politics of Existence/Women's Body Parts

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